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thedeadviperofdorne:

there is no more fitting bird imagery for sansa stark than that of her mockingbird dress.  

she choose it.  she sewed the feathers and silk together with her own hands.  that dress is her own and she wears it like her second skin.  it is not the soft, muted lavenders and greys of king’s landing.  there are no lions and dire wolves fighting at her hips in red and gold and silver.

she never choose to be a little bird, it was a cruel nickname given to her.  sansa did not choose to be caged.  

and it is so so so important that we recognize this as a conscious choice.  mockingbirds are known for their mimicry.  whoever sings the prettiest song wins.  whoever sings the most convincing song lives.

some say arya is the assassin, the faceless man, but what of sansa? how many songs have we heard begin and end?  we know of mercy, of arya and ary, but what of alayne stone of the eyrie?  the little bird?  the stark girl.  sansa lannister.  sansa stark, winterfell’s daughter. 

sansa, the mockingbird, who will outlive them all.

The Injustice of Arya Stark: A Dissection of Her Rise to ‘Fan Favourite’ Status, and it’s Effect on the Interpretation of her Character and That of Her Sister

downlookingup:

asoiafuniversity:

baratheown:

Considering Arya is my favourite character, it’s odd I haven’t written more meta about her; so this is long overdue.

Let’s puzzle over something together: why is Arya, more than any of the Starks, such a favourite among fans (particularly of the show)? More than Sansa, more than Bran or Robb or Rickon, moreso even than Jon, the unofficial poster boy of the series, Arya has garnered widespread love that usually boils down to this: “she’s a badass”. “she’s the only Stark who truly has any backbone.” “she’s a feminist.” “she’s a scrapper.” “she’s a tomboy”—et al. I’m going to examine all of these in this miniature essay, and explain why all of these statements about her character are not only false, but a gross misinterpretation of what she represents as a character.

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BIG SPOILERS HERE. IF YOU HAVEN’T READ THE BOOKS, GO AWAY.

Yeah, I have a lot of issue with this. Particularly when OP says Arya isn’t a product of her surroundings and that she’s just a cold-blooded killer. I think a lot of times we forget that these characters (particularly in the books) are just children.

Several times at the beginning, she has to kill to survive and killing gets easier for her. She loses sight of the value of a human life and eventually, of course, she gets her comeuppance at the House of Black and White.

I don’t think she’s insane. She knows the difference between right and wrong; she simply chooses to ignore it or she twists the situation so she can feel better about it. And yeah, she’s scared. She just wants to go home, but I think as time passes she realizes she can’t. Isn’t there a scene in A Feast for Crows where she sees some men from the Night’s Watch and briefly considers telling them who she is and hitching a ride to Castle Black but then she wonders what Jon will think of her? She’s stuck in Braavos, she has nowhere else to go, so she might as well commit. I can’t imagine what I would do if I went through the horrible, horrible things Arya’s been through, and I think a little sympathy is lacking here.

And OP bemoans people’s tendency to throw over Sansa in favor of Arya, but isn’t this what’s happening here in reverse? Arya isn’t made to make Sansa appear frail. Arya and Sansa are each other’s foils, but I don’t think weakness is the quality being emphasized here. It’s the different but similar types of strengths they embody. Both of them are hiding in plain sight and both of them are pretending to be people they’re not, and I guarantee that before this is over, Sansa will have to do some of the unsavory things Arya has done. Sansa’s not clinging to her morals and beliefs to keep the memory of her family alive, she’s doing it to survive. And the same thing applies to Arya. The though of revenge is what keeps her going. Let her have it. It’s not like she’ll actually get it. Her big moment won’t be her murder attempt on Cersei or anybody on her list. Her big moment will be her murder attempt on someone unexpected. Maybe Dany?

jojothehobbit:

fuckyeahwinterfell:

tumblrofthrones:

watermeloncholy:

professional-widow:

asoiafuniversity:

From fempop.com:

If you’re a progressive feminist and you’re into science fiction, fantasy and westerns you train yourself to watch things differently. The aforementioned genres are not meant for women. We’re second class citizens and after thoughts in most science fiction, fantasy and westerns. There are exceptions. Sometimes we get an Aliens or a Buffy or a Cat Ballou, but they’re not common. So instead we look for “strong” women. The women who exist in the patriarchal society and thrive in it. The best moms and daughters and sisters. We look for women like Catelyn Tully. She can’t fight, because in patriarchal societies women don’t fight. She will never lead the troops into battle or storm a castle for her lover. She’s Penelope at her loom patiently waiting for something to happen and finding agency in the most mundane of tasks.

You like her, and are forced to empathize with her, because she’s the only choice you have.

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WOAH.  This article does a huge disservice to the complex female characters in A Game of Thrones.  Honestly, I don’t really feel like bothering to pick it apart, because anyone who reads all the awesome meta that floats around tumblr will see how clearly problematic this is.  I think this article says far more about the author’s views on women than anything in the ASOIAF novels.

So basically, women who are victims aren’t strong. Fempop can take that mess to the left. 

“You like her, and are forced to empathize with her, because she’s the only choice you have.”

lolwhut

Having linked FemPop’s series (in their individual installments) before, I encourage you (again) to read for yourself and check out some of the fantastic responses in this thread of reblogs!

I read through the whole article and the responses… But seriously, what the heck!?

image

The author sounds like she(?) has absolutely no knowledge of history and doesn’t understand the context of the books… Even though it’s a commentary on the supposed “sexism” in the book, it doesn’t do any justice to the characters.

So what exactly does the author suppose women in that society should be like? Does she expect Martin to have written a completely matriarchal society? Or make a happy go lucky, cheerful story where absolutely no one gets hurt and they all live happily ever after? Oh wait… That’s something Disney would do.

Obviously the article’s author seems to have misinterpreted the text… Some of the themes in the books are quite full on, but they echo themes and cultures from the real world as well. Not all women are the same and not all men are the same. The characters play roles and sometimes people need to conform to or fight against their roles for one reason or another. It provides dynamic and diversity and you can read into their actions to see why they played their game that way. 

Honestly, I love the characters in A Game of Thrones, both the men and the women and I like that Martin doesn’t have propaganda spilling out from every orifice of the story (unlike Glee. Everyone’s favourite propaganda show). He’s telling a story, and people should understand that not all stories are happy and AGOT is not intended as a social commentary on sexism, but a story inspired by history and mythology centred around a patriarchal society. Refer to the titles, “A Game of Thrones”, “A Clash of Kings”… Then compare and contrast to feudal era history. Royal families have always been trained to play roles, to rule, to lead and to engage with other leaders, whether in battle or in diplomacy, and whether you like it or not, most of the time it has been Kings (yes, men!) or strong male Generals who have lead the front. Not to say that a woman can’t be in a strong position… Consider Jeanne D’Arc for example.

But I digress; this article really mind fucked me, its author completely went off the mark.

thisislostinlace:

bonne-bell:

fuckyeahwinterfell:

tumblrofthrones:

watermeloncholy:

professional-widow:

asoiafuniversity:

From fempop.com:

If you’re a progressive feminist and you’re into science fiction, fantasy and westerns you train yourself to watch things differently. The aforementioned genres are not meant for women. We’re second class citizens and after thoughts in most science fiction, fantasy and westerns. There are exceptions. Sometimes we get an Aliens or a Buffy or a Cat Ballou, but they’re not common. So instead we look for “strong” women. The women who exist in the patriarchal society and thrive in it. The best moms and daughters and sisters. We look for women like Catelyn Tully. She can’t fight, because in patriarchal societies women don’t fight. She will never lead the troops into battle or storm a castle for her lover. She’s Penelope at her loom patiently waiting for something to happen and finding agency in the most mundane of tasks.

You like her, and are forced to empathize with her, because she’s the only choice you have.

Read More

WOAH.  This article does a huge disservice to the complex female characters in A Game of Thrones.  Honestly, I don’t really feel like bothering to pick it apart, because anyone who reads all the awesome meta that floats around tumblr will see how clearly problematic this is.  I think this article says far more about the author’s views on women than anything in the ASOIAF novels.

So basically, women who are victims aren’t strong. Fempop can take that mess to the left. 

“You like her, and are forced to empathize with her, because she’s the only choice you have.”

lolwhut

Having linked FemPop’s series (in their individual installments) before, I encourage you (again) to read for yourself and check out some of the fantastic responses in this thread of reblogs!

So bascially what this article from fempop is telling me is that traditional female roles such as that of a wife and mother are inferior to traditional male roles.  And in order for a woman to be strong or interesting, she needs to model herself after a man and be in a role that a man would normally be in.  Okay then.

It’s funny to me how some so called feminists are actually chauvinists in disguise and don’t even realize it.  Feminism is not about putting traditional male roles up on a pedestal and denigrating traditional female roles.  That is exactly what chauvinistic and patriarchal societies have been doing for centuries so how exactly are you helping women by doing the same thing? 

Preach! Feminism is about giving women choice about how to live their lives and respecting women because of their choices. Shitting over women who live traditional lives is no different than FORCING them to live your life, even in a fictional universe because that kind of thinking carries over.

Sansa Stark: first impressions revisited

sparklehorsettes:

ourmrsreynolds:

Just to be clear I am not here to justify gross and unjustifiable opinions about how Sansa sucks. But I do think it’s relevant that the first time I read the books I was (a) thirteen years old and (b) an immediate and lifelong Arya stan. There’s no reason that Arya stans can’t also be Sansa stans, obviously - in fact I’d be side-eying you if you read the series and didn’t come out of it stanning for both the Stark sisters - but the operative words are “if you read the series.” The first time we meet Sansa is through Arya’s eyes, and Arya has a chip on her shoulder the size of Great Wyk. Consequently Sansa does not come off well. I thought she was a bully (an insufferably snooty one at that) and I was indignant on Arya’s behalf. The deceptive thing about this chapter, though, is that when you examine it carefully there is not a shred of evidence that Sansa actually bullies Arya. 

The evidence that Sansa bullies Arya comes later. Wishing that she was killed rather than Lady, saying she should marry Hodor as she is ‘ugly’ ‘stupid and ‘hairy’, mocking her sewing skills and drawing attention to the fact that she struggles with it. Made it quite clear that she was not welcome in King’s Landing.

It’s easy to get caught up in Arya’s emotional turmoil, her mounting anxiety that everybody in the sewing session is ganging up on her, but what does Sansa actually say? That Joffrey is gallant. And Arya is the one who repeats Jon’s assertion that Joffrey “looks like a girl.” As far as I can tell Arya is the one who ignites a minor kerfuffle by spouting Jon’s opinions - an opinion, in this case, which aims to police masculinity by defining femininity as weak.

Or perhaps an attempt to change the conversation or to engage within it more? Arya loves Jon so much that I doubt she is going to pass off an oppurtunity to talk about him. 

It pains me to admit because Jon and Arya are my actual favorite people, but it’s true. And you know what Sansa says next?

“Poor Jon. He gets jealous because he’s a bastard.”

Which we KNOW for FACT is true because we have just spent an entire chapter in Jon’s head where literally all he does is feel sorry for himself during the feast. Because he’s a bastard. I’m glad Sansa only gets four lines in this chapter because I don’t think I could handle her saying any more true things.

Yes, because in the feast, he clearly feels unwelcomed. Arya is the president of the Jon Snow Appreciation Society , of course she’s going to advocate on his behalf. And the assumption that Jon Snow is automatically a) jealous b) a bastard is completely way off and empty. Sansa’s comments are literally, canon and should be treated as such.

I mean, I think Sansa is definitely complicit in Jeyne’s “Arya Horseface” campaign (because they are besties but also because Jeyne is the steward’s daughter and Sansa is Lord Eddard’s daughter) but it’s hard to tell how much of her complicity is Arya projecting:

Sansa was too well bred to smile at her sister’s disgrace, but Jeyne was smirking on her behalf. 

Honestly, Sansa is her older sister. It’s her job and her responsibilty to look out for your younger siblings (hence why Bran felt responsibility for Rickon). To allow someone to bully when you are in a position to stop it (The Warden Of The North’s first Daughter) is in its own, a form of bullying.

Sansa reminds me of those people who run really popular blogs whose comment sections are invariably an unmoderated hot mess; that is to say, she should be held accountable for not coming to Arya’s defense, certainly (this is not a one-off incident; Jeyne admits to Theon in ADWD that she used to make fun of Arya all the time),  but my initial impression of Arya suffering an onslaught of unprovoked ridicule is hardly accurate.The whole situation feels unfair to Arya though, so she goes running to Jon, and the two of them bond over swordfighting.

It is utterly unfair and Arya did suffer greatly. She has stories of Septa Mordane treating her badly “hands of a blacksmith”, felt like a failure in attempts by her mother to make her a lady. Arya Underfoot, Arya Horseface- faced humilation at every turn.

Arya points out that she’s better than Bran with a sword, and it should be her down in the yard. Notice she’s not just running away from an odious activity (needlework) where her performance is consistently subpar, she’s drawntoan activity she’s actually good at. The contrast between Jon, who validates her interest in martial stuff, and Sansa, who excels at a whole string of stuff that Arya has no interest in (sewing, dancing, singing, poetry, fashion, music), could not be more marked. The problem is that her mother, her septa, and everybody else ever seems to believe that the stuff Sansa does well is the only stuff that matters - and they are forever comparing Arya unfavorably to her sister. From ASOS:

Lady Catelyn always wanted her to be like Sansa, to sing and dance and sew and mind her courtesies.

Of course she resents Sansa for being perfect.

Sansa is far from perfect. Honestly, there is little stories or tales regarding Sansa in Winterfell. Her skills and her strengths mainly develop in King’s Landing and Winterfell.

Arya is a proud girl, and what bothers her is not, I think, that needlework is boring and pointless so much as the fact that her stitches are crooked. It’s to escape the evidence of her own incompetence that she bolts from the room.

Really? I think it was mostly due to the public humilation and the jarring environment. The fact that royalty was in the room made it more obvious. She was often being picked on and embarrased. 

As for why she feels the need to make disparaging comments about Joffrey, well:

The tall, handsome one. Sansa got to sit next to him at the feast. Arya had to sit with the little fat one. Naturally.

At this point all we know about Joffrey is that he looks like Justin Bieber. Arya isn’t saying “Joffrey is a despicable little git” she is saying “Why does Sansa always get the good ones???”

It wasn’t fair. Sansa had everything. Sansa was two years older; maybe by the time Arya was born there had been nothing left.

And there you have it. Arya won’t willingly participate in any activity where there’s a chance somebody will point out her inferiority to Sansa; Sansa is obviously hurt and confused that her sister doesn’t want to do sisterly things with her.

Arya has ‘hands of a blacksmith’ and is considered to be physically ugly. Such activities remind her of this in a brutal way. She’s 9. Can you blame her?

Haha I say “obviously” when it wasn’t at all obvious to me on a first read-through. But in Sansa’s mind, who wouldn’t want to eat lemon cakes in the queen’s wheelhouse? Whereas “the queen’s wheelhouse” is exactly the kind of place where somebody is likely to observe that Arya’s hair is uncombed, or her nails are dirty, so Arya is like thanks but no thanks.

I used to let myself off the hook for disliking Sansa in the very beginning

Don’t be too harsh on yourself, Sansa was quite a brat in AGOT. The fact that she still wants to marry Joffrey after the Mycah incident, is well, um…

(when shit hit the fan in King’s Landing I softened pretty quickly), but now I see that the text doesn’t even support that reading. 

Sansa gets better as the text goes along. Became one of my favourites post- Ned’s execution. 

boleyns:

An ode to the underrated women of Game of Thrones:
Let’s talk about something that has bothering me for quite a while: bashing, name-calling and irrational hatred to certain female characters, especially Sansa, Catelyn and Cersei. Condemning Cersei, Catelyn and Sansa, calling them monsters, stupid or heartless is incredibly narrow-minded and it shows how one can’t understand the development of the characters. What has to be kept in mind is that everyone has a back-story and internal logic that make sense, every action they make is a reflection of everything they’ve been through.
I could talk about other characters that I like more than Catelyn but hers is the one good motherhood narrative I’ve ever read. Everyone talks about her hatred for Jon and how cold-hearted she is, but the fact is that Jon is the constant reminder that in someway or another, she doesn’t have full control of her life. She might be married to Ned Stark, have five lovely children be the lady of Winterfell but there is this child, someone else’s child with her husband, whom he must have at least cared about, otherwise why would he bring a bastard home? Catelyn does the best she cans, but it hurts her deeply and she can’t bring herself to actually love Jon.
No, Cersei is not the greatest person, but her Greek tragedy like arc is, in my opinion, the most fascinating one in the whole series. Cersei is ruthless, caring very little about those standing her way, she’s a politician, planning and scheming three steps ahead of most people. Cersei craves for power so vigorously and yet she’s trapped inside her own body, with the restrictions of being a woman (her breakdown in A Clash of Kings continues to be one of my favourite passages).
Contrary to popular belief, Sansa is not dumb. She has a head for politics and she understands the implications of her actions. Now, she’s observing and watching quietly, to later evolve into the best narrative arc of the books. Sansa uses stories of gallant knights and princesses because it’s her way of protecting herself against the madness she’s living.
These ladies have weapons: words, minds and bodies. Unlike a sword or a mace, one word can actually start or finish a fight, it’s just a matter of knowing how to use them.

boleyns:

An ode to the underrated women of Game of Thrones:

Let’s talk about something that has bothering me for quite a while: bashing, name-calling and irrational hatred to certain female characters, especially Sansa, Catelyn and Cersei. Condemning Cersei, Catelyn and Sansa, calling them monsters, stupid or heartless is incredibly narrow-minded and it shows how one can’t understand the development of the characters. What has to be kept in mind is that everyone has a back-story and internal logic that make sense, every action they make is a reflection of everything they’ve been through.

I could talk about other characters that I like more than Catelyn but hers is the one good motherhood narrative I’ve ever read. Everyone talks about her hatred for Jon and how cold-hearted she is, but the fact is that Jon is the constant reminder that in someway or another, she doesn’t have full control of her life. She might be married to Ned Stark, have five lovely children be the lady of Winterfell but there is this child, someone else’s child with her husband, whom he must have at least cared about, otherwise why would he bring a bastard home? Catelyn does the best she cans, but it hurts her deeply and she can’t bring herself to actually love Jon.

No, Cersei is not the greatest person, but her Greek tragedy like arc is, in my opinion, the most fascinating one in the whole series. Cersei is ruthless, caring very little about those standing her way, she’s a politician, planning and scheming three steps ahead of most people. Cersei craves for power so vigorously and yet she’s trapped inside her own body, with the restrictions of being a woman (her breakdown in A Clash of Kings continues to be one of my favourite passages).

Contrary to popular belief, Sansa is not dumb. She has a head for politics and she understands the implications of her actions. Now, she’s observing and watching quietly, to later evolve into the best narrative arc of the books. Sansa uses stories of gallant knights and princesses because it’s her way of protecting herself against the madness she’s living.

These ladies have weapons: words, minds and bodies. Unlike a sword or a mace, one word can actually start or finish a fight, it’s just a matter of knowing how to use them.

sillier-things:

Thinking about this post, and how my first reaction was “but poor Arya!”, but you know what?  Poor Sandor, poor, poor man.

The Rolling Stones once said, “you can’t always get what you want, but you can sometimes get what you need.”  The Stark girls are terrible about giving Sandor what he wants, but they give him what he needs—because it seems clear that Sandor doesn’t know what he needs.  He’s in a world of misery and that can kind of skew your thinking.

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A note on Arya (and Sansa)

miss-m-calling:

I recently finished posting a fic in which, at one point, it is announced that a Stark girl is in bad trouble. The overwhelming reader response to that announcement was, loosely paraphrased, ‘oh no, what’s happened to Sansa?’

And my first reaction was: wait a minute! Why is almost everyone so certain it’s Sansa and not Arya?

Because Sansa is the damsel in distress of the Stark family, especially in a lot of fanon, always needing to be rescued? Whereas – in fanon maybe even more than in the books – Arya is a butt-kicking, Needle-wielding, no-shit-taking little hellcat who can take on the Mountain and win, let alone take care of herself?

Well yes, in a way. Arya certainly “saves herself” in more obvious ways than Sansa often does.

But Arya is also a child, who has been kidnapped (as is and has Sansa), and has had the remarkable good fortune to avoid death, rape, and other forms of extreme violence being perpetrated upon her by very many people on many different occasions. Whether that’s because she was in the company of someone even bigger and scarier or more numerous (the Hound, the BWB) or the circumstances did not allow the other parties to use Arya for their fun (her brief encounter with Biter and Rorge). Arya is hardly an island, entire of itself. Before she reaches Braavos, Arya’s survival and general good health are not due solely to her own resources.

I am not trying to make Arya (or Sansa) seem weaker than she is. But Arya has, all things considered, had more luck than might at once be obvious, in that she reaches Braavos and starts her formal training alive, unmaimed, and unraped. And that’s not all due to her being a butt-kicking, Needle-wielding, etc. Sometimes sheer coincidence or blind (heh) luck is at play.

Just something to consider when the knee-jerk assumption becomes that Sansa always needs rescuing but Arya has all possibilities covered because she’s just that badass.

Sansa, her father’s death, and what holds her to her Stark identity

submitted:

So I’ve been thinking lately, because I’ve thinking about the trueborn Stark POVs a lot lately as representing different facets of the Stark tradition.

Arya embodies the “pack spirit”, and her warging connection to Nymeria binds physically to her Stark identity.

“My brother will kill you, he’s a Stark, he’s more wolf than man, and so am I.”
“In the wolf dreams she was swift and strong, running down her prey with
her pack at her heels.”

Bran embodies the tradition of the magic kingship and the Builder, and so he constantly thinks of himself as the heir to Winterfell. That binds him House Stark.

“The stone is strong…The roots of the trees grow deep, and under the ground the Kings of Winter sit their thrones. So long as those remained, Winterfell remained. It was not dead, just broken. Like me… I’m not dead either
“Bran the Broken, heir to ruins.”

So I was thinking: When Sansa says she is a “Stark”, what does that mean to her? I realized that I didn’t know. She doesn’t have a warg animal anymore, doesn’t have a motto or think over and over again “winter is coming.” Sansa doesn’t think much of honor, not very explicitly, except to condemn the sycophants at court as “dogs” “hooting for approval”, and make a few classist comments about people like Luthor Brune. Sansa is “adrift”. Without something physically real, “Stark” is just a word.

When Ned is murdered, we don’t see the sword come down. It’s told from Arya’s POV, and Yoren shields her from the sight, gods bless his soul. When we get Sansa’s POV immediately after, this is what we get for a description:

“Waking or sleeping, she saw him, saw the gold cloaks fling him down, saw her Ser Ilyn striding forward, unsheathing Ice from the scabbard on his back, saw the moment….the moment when….she had wanted to look away, she had wanted to, her legs had gone out form under her and she had fallen to her knees, yet somehow she could not turn her head, and all the people were screaming and shouting…and for a moment she’d felt safe, but only for a heartbeat, until he said those words, and her fathers’ legs…that was what she remembered, his legs, way they jerked when Ser Ilyn…when the sword….

And Sansa just refuses to think farther or complete the picture. What’s strange is that this is in her mind. She doesn’t ever give us an explicit flashback to it for the rest of her story. Which is strange, and I don’t think it’s an accident.

When Joffrey forces her to look at Ned’s head on a spike, she thinks, “He can make me look at them but he can’t make me see.”

Sansa, we know, represses things she cannot bear to withstand: the less savory parts of her time with the Hound, the UnKiss, “Littlefinger was only a mask he had to wear” etc..

Which brings me to my point: The thing that holds Sansa to her Stark identity is the traumatic memory she’s been repressing since AGOT, and she won’t reclaim her name until she looks it in the face, and recalls every detail and every second.

This Tze post makes an outstanding case for Littlefinger having hopelessly overplayed his hand. He really has only a piece of paper to protect him, which was all Ned Stark had. Nestor Royce ruled the Vale for 15 years in Jon Arryn’s absence, and was the other candidate to be lord protector. Tze writes, “At the end of AFFC, Nestor Royce has physical control of Robert Arryn, complete physical control of Lord Robert’s home for the foreseeable future, physical control over Littlefinger (the garrison at the Gates being loyal to Lord Nestor, not Littlefinger), and probably the support of the Lords Declarant as well.”

Now comes Sansa’s time to shine. When he trusts her to gather some key allies to his side, it will already be too late. His enemies will be closing in and “Alayne” will betray him.

Littlefinger will no doubt be put to death, which will probably be beheading. “Alayne” will be a witness. As the executioner draws his sword, the memory will start coming back, the horror of that moment. Now the headsmen is Ser Ilyn Payne, his sword is Ice. It’s her father’s neck stretched out over the block, his hair rat brown, then black, then brown again. Was always he so gaunt before they put him in the dungeons? The blade comes down, and cuts through in a dull silver flash. She sees it, for the first time. Her father’s head rolls across the stone of the sept, his legs jerk. The crowd at Baelor’s is cheering and roaring, but the godswood of the Gates of the Moon is silent and still.

Littlefinger is dead, and so is his daughter Alayne Stone, and with her all the lies and stories and songs she had ever believed.

Only Sansa Stark remains now, and the memory of the terrible thing they did to her father, her real father: Eddard Stark, Lord of Winterfell.

The North Remembers.

milleemo asked: That post about Sansa being sexualized got me thinking about something that had been bugging me about her costuming in s2 and 3. They had these shots of her in her corset, and she never had any kind of shift or undershirt under it, and I can't help but wonder if that was practical. It def makes her more sexual, but just wearing a stiff corset over nothing but skin had to have been uncomfortable and I'm not sure that's how smallclothes worked. What do you think?

Well, I’m not sure how such clothes worked either, so I looked it up. Here’s a guide to Elizabethan clothes layering, and it shows that a corset is worn over a smock, shift, or chemise. Or we can go to the books themselves for details:

"You shall have smallclothes and hose as well, kirtles and mantles and cloaks, and all else befitting a…a lovely young lady of noble birth.”

The smallclothes were all silk, but the gown itself was ivory samite and cloth-of-silver, and lined with silvery satin. The points of the long dagged sleeves almost touched the ground when she lowered her arms. And it was a woman’s gown, not a little girl’s, there was no doubt of that. The bodice was slashed in front almost to her belly, the deep vee covered over with a panel of ornate Myrish lace in dove-grey. The skirts were long and full, the waist so tight that Sansa had to hold her breath as they laced her into it.

…somehow she managed the laces and buttons, and her cloak and gown and girdle and undersilk slid to the floor, until finally she was stepping out of her smallclothes.

She donned silken smallclothes and a linen shift, and over that a warm dress of blue lambswool.

Quotes all taken from various Sansa chapters — and note there are no corsets ever mentioned. Dresses are worn over shifts, which are worn over smallclothes. The only lacing involved seems to be in the dresses themselves. So women’s fashion seems to be pre-corsetry, similar to the styles worn in the Plantagenet era. (Considering ASOIAF’s inspiration from the Wars of the Roses, this makes sense.) I should also note that smallclothes did not exist in the medieval clothing of our world, and also the dresses in general are rather immodest to be properly historical.

So GoT is on its own with its corsets and how they’re worn without a shift underneath. But the show’s ladies’ costuming in general is not really medieval at all, especially the kimono-inspired wrap dresses of King’s Landing, or the maids’ dresses and Tyrell dresses that are… ancient Greek-ish? Roman? or even modern-inspired.

Regarding sexualization… well, we’ve only seen Sansa’s corset twice, maybe three times IIRC? Once when her dress is torn in the crossbow scene, once in the Riot of King’s Landing, and once when she’s caught getting dressed. There’s context for all of them — maybe the last one is the most “fanservicey”, but it’s not like it comes out of nowhere. Now, if she were wearing a shift under the corset, it would be more modest, it’s true. But then Sansa’s dresses in general tend to be very modest, with long sleeves and little cleavage. Compare her and Margaery, and those few corset scenes are not much really. And note that even the most sexualized book!Sansa scene — her wedding night, when Tyrion has her remove all her clothes — in the equivalent show scene, Sansa never even takes off her dress.

In terms of corset comfort, we can go to Sophie Turner herself:

I had no idea that the costumes would be so complex, there was SUCH brilliant and intricate detail on the dresses! Even the corset that I wear underneath my clothes at King’s Landing that you never see has beautiful dragonflies embroidered on it! Sansa definitely eases from Northern clothing to Southern clothing. The Northern clothing is much more simple with not many patterns and never fitted perfectly to body shape whereas Southern clothing is very tightly fitted with corsets and belts to keep the clothing tight to the body. It imitates Cersei’s style of dress. I prefer the Southern clothing because it’s a lot prettier and fitted although the Northern clothing is very comfortable.

So it’s not that comfortable, but she doesn’t mind, at least.